Chole Richard

No child is programmed to fail

Each of us was born a seed to germinate, grow and flourish. Somebody just needs to know and create the correct condition for that which nature has endowed each of us with to activate itself into action (the ignition). It is the one big question that the education fraternity needs to face headlong and resolve.

So, as you celebrate those high scores in final examinations, (As is the case in Uganda and many other parts of the world), know that the child who has been “inspired to find a calling that changes the world” includes those F9 holders that no school will cheer about, no parent will lift shoulder high, no member of the community wants to identify with, and no media house will celebrate on the front page or television.

No one will tell them it isn’t their fault, and that failing final national examinations does not define them. Instead, it defines us who claim to be the touch bearers that light the way of knowledge. In Uganda, we claim that “The Nation is because We Are”!

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